Styles of Woodturning

Styles of Woodturning

Wood Orientation on Lathe

Spindle:       The primary turning axis and the wood grain are parallel. Often but not always, the turning diameter is less than the length of the work piece. Some bowls are turned with this orientation.

Cross Grain:        The primary turning axis and wood grain are perpendicular. Often used for bowls and platters. Often the turning diameter is larger than the length of the work piece.

Eccentric: See Multi-Axis.

Multi-Axis: When turning the wood, the turning axis is changed to achieve a different effect from the primary turning axis. Does not include adjustments to achieve balance or esthetic effect.

Multiple Parallel Axis: See Multi-Axis. When turning the wood, the turning axis is changed. The new turning axis is parallel to the primary turning axis.

Skew Axis: See Multi-Axis. When turning the wood, the turning axis is changed. The new turning axis is not parallel to the primary turning axis.

Composition of Turning Block

Solid:           The turning project consists of a single block of wood. If project has multiple pieces, each is a solid turning block.

Laminated: Flat, rectangular, or square pieces of wood are glued together before turning.

Segmented: Multiple, similar polygons of wood are glued together into rings; Wood rings are stacked and glued together into the turning work. Grain of wood runs around the block perpendicular to the primary turning axis.

Open Segmented:            Similar to Segmented Turning except that spaces are left between the polygons in each ring.

Stave Segmented: Polygons of wood are glued together into cylinders; Grain orientation is parallel to the primary turning axis.

Specialty:   Turning block is composed of multiple regular pieces but does not fall into other categories in this section.

2 Responses to “Styles of Woodturning”

  1. […] my web site to define woodturning terms. The goal is to provide clarity about woodturning styles. Here’s the link. Your feedback will be […]

  2. Bob Harrington says:

    Back to basics sounds like a good idea for me.

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